logo



American made glass and pottery to be featured at Nashville Show

Staff Reports • Updated Jun 26, 2016 at 4:00 PM

A wide variety of American-made glassware and pottery will be on display July 16-17 at the 17th annual Elegant and Depression Glass Show and Sale in Nashville.  

The show will be July 16 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and July 17 from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. in the Exhibitor Building at the Fairgrounds in Nashville. Admission is $6 per person and is good for both days. Parking is free with a show card.

The show will feature nationally known dealers from across the country with glassware and pottery made by U.S. manufacturers during the last century.  Glassware will include early American pattern glass, depression glass, elegant glass, and mid-century modern. Manufacturers of this glassware include Heisey, Imperial, Tiffin, Cambridge, Fostoria, Jeanette, Hocking, and others that are no longer in business. Dealers may have pottery by Roseville, McCoy, Hall and other American potters.

Each year the show features a display to highlight a pattern or type of glass.  This year’s display will be candlesticks from the elegant glass era that ran from the 1920s through the 1950s. During this time period, glass companies made many different types and styles of candleholders to provide options for decorating and entertaining. The display will show the wide variety of candlesticks made by Fostoria Glass Co. and other manufacturers.

A special seminar on July 16 at 1 pm. will feature Sandy Bridwell-Walker, an authority on using glassware in formal dinner settings. She will discuss proper table settings and etiquette for a formal dinner circa 1930. Her presentation will illustrate the placement of pieces on the table and the correct etiquette for dining. The seminar is free to attendees.

Another service provided at the show will be glass repair. Richard Heldenbrand from Michigan will be available to provide minor repair for chipped or broken glassware. He will also offer for sale glassware repurposed into necklaces, earrings, ring trees, nightlights and bells. Shoppers may find a unique piece of jewelry that matches their glassware collection.

The Fostoria Glass Society of Tennessee, a chapter of the Fostoria Glass Society of America will serve as host. Proceeds from the show are used to support the Fostoria Glass Museum in Moundsville, W. Va., and other glass museums.

Recommended for You