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Nancy Evins: Here’s a quiz for me

Nancy Evins • Updated May 15, 2016 at 4:00 PM

I got a phone call from a bridge player who told me she got all three questions correct in the pop quiz a couple of weeks ago. Congratulations, Bette.

I decided it was time for me to have a quiz myself to check if I knew the answers so I pulled out a bridge book by William Root, “How to Defend a Bridge Hand,” and as I looked at two examples of his quiz I realized this was going to be like my first week in a statistics class at the University of Tennessee.

There were about 40 of us in that class, and after a week (consisting of three days, one hour each), we were given a pop quiz. When our test papers came back, the professor told us that there had been only three grades, zero, 25 percent and 50 percent.

I got 50 percent and was so dismayed until the next class where more than 20 of the students had dropped out.

The professor said, “There were too many in this class so I got rid of the cowards and from now on, if you get any part of the question right, you will get credit for it, not like where I ruled out the whole question with one mistake.”

This quiz has several parts to it, and I will confess, I did not get it right all the way through….so take it with me.

 North: (S) J 7 2

           (H) 5 4 3

           (D) Q J 4

           (C) K Q J 2

 West:  (S) 10 5

           (H) Q J 10 9 8                                            

           (D) A 9 8 6 2

           (C) 3

You are West and the bidding has gone, with you and your partner passing, South one spade, North two spades, South four spades. The complete hand will be shown later.

You are on lead so what is your lead?

The three of clubs, I got this right. Your partner takes the ace and leads back the four of clubs, which you ruff.

What suit do you lead back and which card in that suit? I only got half of this right. The four is a small card so it says lead the lower of the two other suits besides trump and that would be a diamond.

Now here is where I messed up. I would lead the ace of diamonds. I can see eight diamonds and think perhaps my partner has a singleton or a void and can trump my second diamond and return another club.

Mr. Root says lead the six of diamonds because East is promising the king of diamonds (really?) and can now lead another club. You have now set the contract or at least Root did.

If I had done that I probably would have been fussed at for not leading my ace.

This is the whole hand: 

 North: (S) J 7 2

           (H) 5 4 3

           (D) Q J 4

           (C) K Q J 2

 West: (S) 10 5

           (H) Q J 10 9 8                                            

           (D) A 9 8 6 2

           (C) 3

South: (S) A K Q 9 6 4

            (H) A K 2

            (D) 10

            (C) 10 7 6

East:    (S) 8 3

             (H) 7 6

             (D) K 7 5 3

             (C) A 9 8 5 4

I’d like to know how that statistics professor would have made out on this had he been a bridge player.

Nancy Evins, of Lebanon, is a certified bridge instructor. Email her at na_evins@att.net.

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