logo



Letter to the Editor: It’s time to celebrate Constitution Day

Staff Reports • Updated Sep 20, 2017 at 3:00 PM

To the Editor:

As we reflect on 230 years of the U.S. Constitution, let us remember the framers of the Constitution were not only thinking of themselves, but also how to create freedoms and liberty for every citizen for generations to come. 

Let us also remember that the Constitution is not to control the citizens. It is to restrict what the government can do to us. It certainly hasn’t felt that way for almost 100 years.  

We are officially more than $20 trillion in debt, government controls just about everything we do, all the while elected officials provide empty promises, never leave office and build political treasure.

Inscribed on the wall in the Jefferson Memorial, it states, “I am not an advocate for frequent changes in laws and constitutions but laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind.” Since 1791, America has changed the Constitution to end slavery, repeal prohibition, eliminate the poll tax and give women the right to vote. As we look to today’s problems, how do we go hand and hand of the human mind?  

President John F. Kennedy said, “Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix blame on the past.  Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.”  

The framers of the Constitution left us a gift to stand up for ourselves and control the government’s time, money and power. Article V allows the states to balance this power back to the people. We must stand together to seek that right answer. Find out how you can at conventionofstates.com. We are responsible for our own future.  As Glinda the witch told Dorothy, “My dear, you had the power all along.” Well, so do we the people.

The Convention of States is currently organized in all 50 states with more than 1 million volunteers and supporters committed to limiting the authority of the federal government. Eight state legislatures have called for a limited convention of states, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Missouri and North Dakota. An additional 32 state legislatures have filed resolutions calling for a limited convention of states. For further information, visit conventionofstates.com.

Mark Charest

Tennessee Director

Convention of States

Recommended for You