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Ruth Correll: Pasture, fence-row weed control talk upcoming

Ruth Correll • Feb 13, 2018 at 9:47 PM

Soon, many folks will be concerned about weed control in their pastures and hayfields. This is one topic that is never stale with new products coming into the market frequently. 

Timing of any herbicide application is important to success. Neil Rhodes, UT Extension weed management specialist, will discuss “Pasture and Fence Row Weed Control” at a meeting Feb. 22 at 7:30 a.m. at the James E. Ward Agricultural Center.  Yes, the time is 7:30 a.m. The meeting will be in the Arnett Education Building. Light refreshments will be served, and reservations are requested. Call the UT Extension Office at 615-444-9584 to reserve your seat. It is a good opportunity to learn about strategies for weed control success.

Choosing the right herbicide for a weed control issue can be confusing, intimidating and a time-consuming process. Shopping for any consumer product can be difficult. However, the most frustrating part about shopping for herbicide products is trying to determine if you are actually getting the right product to control your problem weeds. Knowing how to interpret a product label can be extremely helpful. The label contains all the information you need to properly apply the product. However, there are a few things you need to consider before you purchase an herbicide.

Proper identification of the target weed is the first and most important step in finding the best control measure. Weeds that you may encounter will either be classified as a broadleaf, grass or sedge. In addition, weeds may also be classified by their life cycle, annual, biennial or perennial. After you have made a positive identification of your problem weed, you may start the process of selecting an herbicide product that will give you maximum control of the target weed. 

When you go to a store to make your purchase, you likely will encounter a broad offering of herbicides. The question now is where do I start. Read the label. The label is the law. The herbicide product label contains the information you will need to know for selecting the best product and more importantly, it contains all the information you need to know when it comes to safely handling and applying the herbicide product you choose. The label gives you specific information about where the herbicide can be applied. For many products, there is a broad range of differences in allowable use areas.

Read the “Weeds Controlled” section. This section has a list of weeds that the product controls when applied at the appropriate rate and application timing. Some herbicides will need to be applied before weeds emerge, while others may have weed size restrictions when applied post-emergence to certain weeds. Usually, specific information about the rates and timings for control of specific weeds will be found in this section.  

Do not rely on the trade name for selecting appropriate herbicide products. Often, trade names will change or can be similar for products containing vastly different active ingredients. 

The precautions statements are an important part of the label. This area of the label has information about specific things to do or not to do to limit potential risks. Information regarding irrigation, herbicide movement, sensitive plant precautions and other useful hints are contained in this section of the label. 

Always remember the label is the law. Pesticide use is governed by state and federal regulations, so be sure to read the entire label and follow all label directions. If you have questions or concerns, contact your local Extension agent for help. With proper handling and use, herbicides are safe and effective tools for rapidly controlling many weeds.

For more information, contact the UT-TSU Extension Office in Wilson County at 615-444-9584. You can also find us on Facebook or visit extension.tennessee.edu/wilson. Ruth Correll, UT Extension-TSU Cooperative Extension agent in Wilson County, may be reached at 615-444-9584 or acorrell@utk.edu.

 

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